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Cream — White Room
Album: Wheels Of Fire
Avg rating:
8.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3495









Released: 1968
Length: 4:48
Plays (last 30 days): 4
In the white room with black curtains near the station
Black-roof country, no gold pavements, tired starlings
Silver horses, ran-down moonbeams, in your dark eyes
Dawn-light smiles on you leaving my contentment

I'll wait in this place
Where the sun never shines
Wait in this place
Where the shadows run from themselves

You said no strings could secure you at the station
Platform ticket, restless diesels, goodbye windows
I walked into such a sad time at the station
As I walked out, felt my own need just beginning

I'll wait in the queue
When the trains come back
Lie with you
Where the shadows run from themselves

At the party, she was kindness in the hard crowd
Consolation for the old wound now forgotten
Yellow tigers crouched in jungles in her dark eyes
She's just dressing, goodbye windows, tired starlings

I'll sleep in this place
With the lonely crowd
Lie in the dark
Where the shadows run from themselves
Comments (366)add comment
Born in '68 I was reared on classic rock and still love much of it today, but have heard it over and again.  I was drawn to the originality of it which drives much of what I enjoy listening to today.

There's nothing like discovering a new artist/song and sharing it.  RP is a rock centric station I love and throws in new music every now and then.  I find most of the new music played here to be mellow and not engaging.  I would love to hear RP better explore the vast wealth of new music out there, while staying true to its standards and spirit!
 sfoster66 wrote:

I am quite certain that one had to be there....



A fair number of us were.  I still like Clapton essentially soloing through the entire track, something like Cippollina with first bit of "Who Do You Love"
Historically an EC guy, in the last weeks I’ve come to the realization that Cream was Jack’s band Love this song. And there’s a Montreal girl who would line up w this,…
I am quite certain that one had to be there....
 jsegal21132 wrote:

Ginger Baker on the drums 🪘



Cream! Second best rock power trio. Grand Funk Railroad is #1. W/o a doubt.
Ginger Baker on the drums 🪘
 SanFranGayMan wrote:
I was 20 in 68 and this song and the music of this era are still relevant for me today. It was a time of exploring oneself via drugs, a time of fear of draft and becoming military industrial complex fodder in Viet Nam-that or a Canadian. Protesting politics, the environment, crap food and wearing one's freak flag-long hair-and trying to not get  beat up by Pillbillies in East TN. A bracing time that induced some serious friendships that survive and thrive today. This music will never get old for most of us in that era. 
 
Me too, cruising around LA and all these bands were the sound. At the Farewell Concert at The Forum in Inglewood we couldn't remember where we parked the Alfa so we just sat at the top of the stairs and watched everybody leave. This was the America I love and the reason I listen to RP every day!
My second 10 today! Thank you RP!!!
It's a ten.  What a band and what a drummer.  
This is the stuff of mainstream radio--way overplayed.  Very disappointing to hear it here, especially considering Cream had many other songs to choose from.
 jasko wrote:
Love that raw drum sound.
 
Ginger Baker's trademark flap-a-doodles
Is that one of the greatest rock  song endings of all time? I humbly submit: Hell Yes !!
Love that raw drum sound.
This amp goes to eleven. Spinal Tap, Christopher Guest.
Only on RP would Ravel's Bolero be followed by Cream's White Room.  And it worked!
An inspired  transition from Ravel's Bolero to White Room.  I saw Ginger Baker making the point about his contribution to Cream's musical arrangements. As an example he claimed to have put the "Ravel's Bolero" in to White Room.   He was suitably disparaging about Bruce's inclination to making harmonious and poppy.  He also had  a dig at Pete Brown's lyrics, natch - generally rather than specifically  as I recall it.   I am sure he would have also mentioned Wrapping Paper...
An awesome (acquired taste) version performed by Jimmy Barnes on his anthology greatest hits deluxe edition is well worth a listen. JB is one my all time best musicians
One of THE great all-time train songs!
I wish I could have been there to see the look on Clapton's face the first time he witnessed Jimi Hendrix on stage.
 lizardking wrote:

You're right, 9 wasn't enough.
+1 to 10
volume cranked to 44 (which is an 11 on this system)
What? ....Indeed
Long Live RP and my hearing!!
 

Still sounds wonderful
 ExploitingChaos wrote:
10

What?

10
 
You're right, 9 wasn't enough.
+1 to 10
volume cranked to 44 (which is an 11 on this system)
What? ....Indeed
Long Live RP and my hearing!!
 DanO-1 wrote:

Agreed. We are the same age. My enlightening to "good" rock music was with WXRT 93.1 Chicago. In 1972 they were only on air at night. And I listened. XRT launched me into a bigger spectrum of music.
 

I too am an avid XRT listener almost since its conception and find it amazing how long DJs have lasted on this station.   The music was always great and the DJs made it even more special.
 SanFranGayMan wrote:
I was 20 in 68 and this song and the music of this era are still relevant for me today. It was a time of exploring oneself via drugs, a time of fear of draft and becoming military industrial complex fodder in Viet Nam-that or a Canadian. Protesting politics, the environment, crap food and wearing one's freak flag-long hair-and trying to not get  beat up by Pillbillies in East TN. A bracing time that induced some serious friendships that survive and thrive today. This music will never get old for most of us in that era. 
 
Keep on trucking! Keep up the fight! From a younger brother; the kids are alright.
A pretty good album, was?
Proclivities wrote:

Woolworth's stores where I grew up had pretty good record selections back in the 60's and 70's.  I assume the one you went to was not in Austria.
 

I have been to Austria...lovely
Yep. A 10.
10

What?

10
 SanFranGayMan wrote:
I was 20 in 68 and this song and the music of this era are still relevant for me today. It was a time of exploring oneself via drugs, a time of fear of draft and becoming military industrial complex fodder in Viet Nam-that or a Canadian. Protesting politics, the environment, crap food and wearing one's freak flag-long hair-and trying to not get  beat up by Pillbillies in East TN. A bracing time that induced some serious friendships that survive and thrive today. This music will never get old for most of us in that era. 
 
I was minus 9 in 68, though I'm sure your great post would have been similar to my life had I been created sooner!  Long Live RP!!
 nagsheadlocal wrote:


In the eastern part of the state in the late 60s, after sundown, we tuned to WABC (NYC) with Cousin Brucie or WLS (Chicago) to hear music like this. I can remember listening to "Beatles Countdown" on WABC and hearing Cream for the first time on WLS. When my dad got me a shortwave radio for Christmas one year I could get the BBC, Radio Hilversum, etc, and the musical world really opened up.

Nowadays we have internet radio like RP to relieve the god-awful mess that regular radio has become. Ever listen to drive time FM on the way to work? The endless stupidity will make you cringe.
 Nagshead local I have found myself as I get ting older listening to stations like this or WFMU or WCBN  just so I can hear some great music not the same bullshit day after day

 jrozzelle wrote:

In the Piedmont of North Carolina the only non-commercial station was WDAV, the Davidson College radio station, between the hours of 11Pm and 1Am.  
 

In the eastern part of the state in the late 60s, after sundown, we tuned to WABC (NYC) with Cousin Brucie or WLS (Chicago) to hear music like this. I can remember listening to "Beatles Countdown" on WABC and hearing Cream for the first time on WLS. When my dad got me a shortwave radio for Christmas one year I could get the BBC, Radio Hilversum, etc, and the musical world really opened up.

Nowadays we have internet radio like RP to relieve the god-awful mess that regular radio has become. Ever listen to drive time FM on the way to work? The endless stupidity will make you cringe.
I was 20 in 68 and this song and the music of this era are still relevant for me today. It was a time of exploring oneself via drugs, a time of fear of draft and becoming military industrial complex fodder in Viet Nam-that or a Canadian. Protesting politics, the environment, crap food and wearing one's freak flag-long hair-and trying to not get  beat up by Pillbillies in East TN. A bracing time that induced some serious friendships that survive and thrive today. This music will never get old for most of us in that era. 
My mom suffered this over and over again on our home stereo back in the day but she did let me play the album.
 jamesbowne907 wrote:
11 on a scale of ten since it was released. 
 
gotta agree with this. 
11 on a scale of ten since it was released. 
 DocStrangelove wrote:
was awesome then.
rather tired now.
RP should not mean re-play all the stuff from when your were 12.
 
The song hasn't changed at all.  You may be tired of it, but that's purely a personal issue.

Nice of you to share with Bill what RP should be, though.
There's only one Ginger Baker and there was only one Jack Bruce.  I thought rhythm was a word - something coincidental - until I heard Cream.  Bill, with regard to your comment on the lyrics. I believe Bruce is on record as saying they were mainly a matter of what sounded best and what he was able to phrase.  But although we have quite a bit of it more Cream please...
 Baby_M wrote:
Platform ticket, restless diesels, goodbye windows...

Just love that line.

 
I recently took a long distance train trip, and that verse was playing in my head while we were waiting at the depot.
 below72 wrote:
68' - I'm 14.  AM radio was "refried big band (usually good) or bubble-gum music stations which were just god-awful. But then, at night, beginning in 67', Brother Love was on the only FM station in western PA out of Pittsburgh playing "underground music."  67' 68' 69' ...that guy was the connection to the world outside of parochial western, PA.  And describing that era to millennials or anyone under the age of 40 for that matter is impossible. 

 
 
In the Piedmont of North Carolina the only non-commercial station was WDAV, the Davidson College radio station, between the hours of 11Pm and 1Am.  During that two hour time slot the student DJ's could play pretty much anything they wanted to.  (The station signed off at 1Am.  During the day it was classical music.)  If you were growing up in Charlotte this is where you first heard bands like early REM, The Clash, English Beat, Lou Reed, ska, reggae, anything outside of the mainstream FM and AM playlists.  It wasn't the sixties, but my discovery of this new musical landscape was, I think, no less thrilling that what DanO and Below72 experienced a few years earlier.

I went on to apply to attend Davidson (go Wildcats) and spent some late hours in the broadcast booth "helping" my DJ friends choose music.  Sadly, about 20 years ago, WDAV went to 24hr programming, all classical.  Wonder what happened to the non-classical vinyl record collection.   
Just a thought... could this be the first example of "Prog Rock" as opposed to Pink Floyd's psychedelic rock of the same time?
 below72 wrote:
68' - I'm 14.  AM radio was "refried big band (usually good) or bubble-gum music stations which were just god-awful. But then, at night, beginning in 67', Brother Love was on the only FM station in western PA out of Pittsburgh playing "underground music."  67' 68' 69' ...that guy was the connection to the world outside of parochial western, PA.  And describing that era to millennials or anyone under the age of 40 for that matter is impossible. 

 
Agreed. We are the same age. My enlightening to "good" rock music was with WXRT 93.1 Chicago. In 1972 they were only on air at night. And I listened. XRT launched me into a bigger spectrum of music.
 veloman wrote:

Yeh, what if Jack, Jimi and Ginger had got together. Wonder if they ever played together? Could have been interesting. 
 

 
woulda preferred Jimi, Bootsy Collins and Keith Moon!
 thewiseking wrote:

there WERE plenty better; Jeff Beck, Duane Allman, Jimi, Johnny Winter, Mick Taylor, not to mention all of the next level Country, Bluegrass and Jazz players yet...............this guy got hung with the GOD moniker

 
Yeh, what if Jack, Jimi and Ginger had got together. Wonder if they ever played together? Could have been interesting. 
 
 Imkirok wrote:
If these guys would have had a better lead guitarist, they might have gone somewhere.

 
there WERE plenty better; Jeff Beck, Duane Allman, Jimi, Johnny Winter, Mick Taylor, not to mention all of the next level Country, Bluegrass and Jazz players yet...............this guy got hung with the GOD moniker
A year or two before this classic rocker, a Western movie, Duel at Diablo, was in the theaters. Good western. (I saw it years later, on the tube.)  Lots of rigorous locations and many bloody bullet holes. I remember reading one review of the movie that mentioned the music soundtrack: the drums, the drums. 

That's Cream. The drums, the drums. 

68' - I'm 14.  AM radio was "refried big band (usually good) or bubble-gum music stations which were just god-awful. But then, at night, beginning in 67', Brother Love was on the only FM station in western PA out of Pittsburgh playing "underground music."  67' 68' 69' ...that guy was the connection to the world outside of parochial western, PA.  And describing that era to millennials or anyone under the age of 40 for that matter is impossible. 
 below72 wrote:
This song, this band, this era, all become more iconic with every passing year
{#Notworthy} 

 
At first I thought you wrote ironic...and I was there at the time.
If these guys would have had a better lead guitarist, they might have gone somewhere.
I admit the song is great. 40 years ago when I was a teenager I'd give it a 10. But damn, I've heard this song probably 69,669 times so will have to go to an 8 just for overplay on every damn classic rock station ever.
 moodfood wrote:
 
 uh well no, but two outa three ain't bad..

 
made me LOL - great reply {#Roflol}
 keller1 wrote:
Ginger Baker is the most overrated drummer ever.

 

{#Naughty}  {#Mad}  {#Moon}

Hy Per Bole is your full name me thinks. Ig Norance. 
 MrsTom wrote:
Those poor tired starlings
 
I guess running down those moonbeams must take a lot of energy - and those damn silver horses are always in the way.
This song, this band, this era, all become more iconic with every passing year
{#Notworthy} 
Imagine what this would sound like with access to a modern guitar board.

No matter.  Love me this dino shit!  Still sounds great after all these years. 
 keller1 wrote:
Ginger Baker is the most overrated drummer ever.

 
{#Liar}
Off with your cabeza!
fuck no, not this dino shit again and again and again
Ginger Baker is the most overrated drummer ever.
Maybe true that Clapton rested way too much on his laurels, and did too much smack but wow, the early years were Oh My God good!
 MrsTom wrote:
Those poor tired starlings
 
If you think those starlings were tired, check these poor little things out ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Pests_Campaign 
Seems that in a recent interview on BBC, Keith Richards mentioned that the new Stones album is going to be a classic blues album with an emphasis on Chicago blues, with EC adding to some of the guitar work. Can't forget that it was the 60s Brit bands that brought blues back to the American mainstream.
 
 moodfood wrote:
 
 uh well no, but two outa three ain't bad..

 
Meatloaf!
 Stefen wrote:
These guys are all still alive.

  
 uh well no, but two outa three ain't bad..
These guys are all still alive.
 nagsheadlocal wrote:
Listening to this on WABC on a transistor radio propped under my pillow (way past lights-out) after all the local AM stations had gone off the air. Kids today just don't understand how exciting that was.

 
Me too! Clark, NJ, 1965 - 68.  Way past my 9PM curfew. Cousin Bruce and Dan Ingram and who ever else. Top 40 (and if not this tune, then all the others: Strawberry Alarm Clock, The Lemon Pipers, Every Mothers's Son, The Turtles...)  How subversive!
 Baby_M wrote:


Platform ticket, restless diesels, goodbye windows...


Just love that line.

 
{#High-five}
Subtitled:  "Eric Clapton discovers the wah-wah pedal."
Nice to hear the young man and one of his dad's best friend's back to back

Cream — White Room 
 Dahlia_Gumbo wrote:

Me too! Special days.

 
Radio Paradise reminds me, and it's why I love RP, of the early days of FM radio.
 nagsheadlocal wrote:
Listening to this on WABC on a transistor radio propped under my pillow (way past lights-out) after all the local AM stations had gone off the air. Kids today just don't understand how exciting that was.

 
Me too! Special days.


Platform ticket, restless diesels, goodbye windows...


Just love that line.
cannot get any better. Absolutely amazing!
Fresh......
Quite literally, it gets no better.
Ginger cookin with fire on them skins.. {#Drummer}
Those poor tired starlings
Listening to this on WABC on a transistor radio propped under my pillow (way past lights-out) after all the local AM stations had gone off the air. Kids today just don't understand how exciting that was.
 kcar wrote:

I don't know all the reasons they split back in the 60s, but part of it had to be the animosity between Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce. They still slag each other off and Clapton said that he didn't want to keep playing with them after the reunion concerts in 2005. 

I was going to post some quotes from Bruce and Baker about the other guy but it becomes a bit depressing to read the back and forth. I get the impression that Ginger Baker is the more difficult of the two (there was that documentary "Beware of Mr. Baker") but I'm sure that Jack Bruce shares some of the blame. 

It really is too bad: they put out some great music. It always amazed me how much sound just the three of them produced.   

 
Well, according to Clapton Ginger was kind of a disturbance guy for him, and also blames his attitude for the failure of the next experiment with Steve Windwook (Blind Faith). However, he affirms that if Windwood would have been in Cream the thing could have prolonged, a bit of contradiction, but R&R gossiping anyway.

They produced these great two studio albums together and many more afterwards each on their way, evolving in a way that probably the big constraint of Cream, consisting in 3 very (too?) talented guys would not allow, Sometimes they even sounded like each going on their way in the long versions of some songs on live performances, difficult to concile with a group spirit I think.

They had their moment, and created golden pieces of R&R history!
Yes Bill, thanks!! This is one of the best and more primitive moments of the R&R/R&B !! The essence is there, and the performance by these 3 great guys was incredible! Beautiful!!!
 illinimax wrote:
RIP Jack Bruce
 
Indeed.

I'll wait in this place
Where the sun never shines
Wait in this place
Where the shadows run from themselves
RIP Jack Bruce
           iconic    {#Kiss}
 bexhillos wrote:
Three piece groups are few, Lead, Bass Guitar and drums that is, but of those Cream was the best, three talented musicians. Eric Clapton, God on Guitar, though when someone many years ago shouted out 'Clapton is god' at a concert he shouted back ' No I'm not I'm just a bloody guitar player. Jack Bruce Bass and Lead vocals, strong bass playing and superb voacalist. As for Ginger Baker, Drums, stunning, thunderous, musical, very few have bettered him. They were not around long enough, maybe there was not much material for more albums, or maybe all three knew they could'nt last, they were of their time and the pop world is fickle. As far as I'm concerned a solid 10, Godlike.

 
I don't know all the reasons they split back in the 60s, but part of it had to be the animosity between Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce. They still slag each other off and Clapton said that he didn't want to keep playing with them after the reunion concerts in 2005. 

I was going to post some quotes from Bruce and Baker about the other guy but it becomes a bit depressing to read the back and forth. I get the impression that Ginger Baker is the more difficult of the two (there was that documentary "Beware of Mr. Baker") but I'm sure that Jack Bruce shares some of the blame. 

It really is too bad: they put out some great music. It always amazed me how much sound just the three of them produced.   
Very nice classic song !!!
Shabby city area,
Meets girl, loves her, they both trip.
She has to go to work, leaves him in bed.

He meets her at a party later, she's kind, but disinterested.
He's now sad and lonely.


OR


Musician has a good trip and pens down unrelated interesting lyrics, takes them to the band, they jam and a classic is born. 
I was lucky enough to see them in Dallas. Baker was a God and he acted like it. Crossroads is my favorite.
 
bexhillos wrote:
Three piece groups are few, Lead, Bass Guitar and drums that is, but of those Cream was the best, three talented musicians. Eric Clapton, God on Guitar, though when someone many years ago shouted out 'Clapton is god' at a concert he shouted back ' No I'm not I'm just a bloody guitar player. Jack Bruce Bass and Lead vocals, strong bass playing and superb voacalist. As for Ginger Baker, Drums, stunning, thunderous, musical, very few have bettered him. They were not around long enough, maybe there was not much material for more albums, or maybe all three knew they could'nt last, they were of their time and the pop world is fickle. As far as I'm concerned a solid 10, Godlike.

 


I don't ever want to go back to my teen years, except for the excitement caused by the release of a (then-) new LP like this.

This (personal account) is what started it all for me: https://ca-dreaming.com/Tunage/Cream/


 bexhillos wrote:
Three piece groups are few, Lead, Bass Guitar and drums that is,
 
The Police?
















I'll get my coat and leave......
Three piece groups are few, Lead, Bass Guitar and drums that is, but of those Cream was the best, three talented musicians. Eric Clapton, God on Guitar, though when someone many years ago shouted out 'Clapton is god' at a concert he shouted back ' No I'm not I'm just a bloody guitar player. Jack Bruce Bass and Lead vocals, strong bass playing and superb voacalist. As for Ginger Baker, Drums, stunning, thunderous, musical, very few have bettered him. They were not around long enough, maybe there was not much material for more albums, or maybe all three knew they could'nt last, they were of their time and the pop world is fickle. As far as I'm concerned a solid 10, Godlike.
 nagsheadlocal wrote:
Growing up in the rural South, I had no idea why he was waiting in the "Q" - or was he waiting on "Q" from James Bond movies?

I just figured it was more psychedelic inscrutability.   

 
yes, and I also wondered why Roger got "in the "Q" to get on the bus that takes me to you" there was some psychedelic magic going on there too.
 nagsheadlocal wrote:
Growing up in the rural South, I had no idea why he was waiting in the "Q" - or was he waiting on "Q" from James Bond movies?

I just figured it was more psychedelic inscrutability.   

 
It's "the queue".


 jam5ie76 wrote:
Not a fan of Clapton.

But this is a solid excellent.

 
Glad you didn't misspell excellent with excrement.
 wolfkiss wrote:
I'm not quite sure why the lyrics are taking such a beating.  So many complaints, I went to go read them, and found them full of imagery.  With ease I was able to imagine myself in that tense space of both wanting and not wanting a woman.

What you get from good lyrics or a good poem should be your own.  If you hear/read them and get nothing, that's shallowness on your part not that of the artist.

 
Personally, I don't think these lyrics are "bad" - they seem pretty standard for 1968, but are you saying that all poetry or lyrics are "good", and it is only the readers or listeners who "get nothing" from them who are shallow?  Thinking that some lyrics are silly or dated (despite their "imagery") does not automatically make one shallow.
 hencini wrote:
The drums.  I freakin' love the drums. 

 
Yeppers.  It is not often that the drums are the lead ...
 {#Nyah}Spliff wrote:
Pretty amazing band when Eric Clapton is the weakest member.

 


Brilliant lyrics.
The drums.  I freakin' love the drums. 
      I'm Tripping man! {#Roflol}
I prefer the live version from "Live Cream vol. II" but this still works for me. Definitely a period piece, but hey so is "Smells Like Teen Spirit" which Bill is spinning right now. Odd, but I'm more willing to listen to Cream than Nirvana and Nirvana's from my generation. I've gotten really tired of Kurt's gritty, messy anger. It worked back in the early 90s but these days he reminds me of a weekend binge-drinker in my neighborhood. 

Love, love the new "show lyrics" tab. Much easier to spot and laugh about mondegreens now. Always thought Jack Bruce was singing about "landau moonbeams" but no it's "ran-down moonbeams" which makes things so much clearer.  
Ginger Baker's drumming really makes the preternatural quality of this piece, it is "Godlike", thank you.
Very nice!
 mikec09 wrote:
I know it's heresy to say so . . . but . . . Classic example of song that I loved back then that "doesn't stand the test of time".  Even despite Ginger and Eric's efforts . . . 

Sigh. 
 
I've always liked Cream and mostly because of Jack Bruce.  I think he is very underrated as a musician.


Had to bump!

Inamorato wrote:
In the white room, with black curtains...

 

One of the sound tracks of my yoof and built into my soul so I can't rate it objectively. 10.
So sorry for people for whom this brilliant song doesn't 'stand the test of time'. Always be the best song ever!!
 mikec09 wrote:
I know it's heresy to say so . . . but . . . Classic example of song that I loved back then that "doesn't stand the test of time".  Even despite Ginger and Eric's efforts . . . 

Sigh. 
 
Interesting. I was just going to write something. So I will just say that I agree with you.
I know it's heresy to say so . . . but . . . Classic example of song that I loved back then that "doesn't stand the test of time".  Even despite Ginger and Eric's efforts . . . 

Sigh. 
Growing up in the rural South, I had no idea why he was waiting in the "Q" - or was he waiting on "Q" from James Bond movies?

I just figured it was more psychedelic inscrutability.   
I love screaming guitars and a little wah wah goes a long way with me

Now there's one you don't hear every day.

Of course I used to hear it every day, for about 25 years, when I listened to classic rock radio.


I've heard this song a gazillion times and so many versions over the years.  Seen Clapton a half a dozen times over many decades.  Missed Cream.  When Clapton plays this song in whatever band he's curently in, he's just doing a cover.

Finally when I heard Cream do it at their HOF induction again after so many years, it hit me like a ton of bricks.  Its Cream itself that really makes this song so good.  The opening chords sounded perfect as did what followed.  Clapton is made so much better when he plays with Cream.  Don't know why nor do I really care. 
 lily34 wrote:

love this comment.
 



Perfect Conclusion!.
 Spliff wrote:
Pretty amazing band when Eric Clapton is the weakest member.
 

say what ??
Pretty amazing band when Eric Clapton is the weakest member.
Cream used to be outstanding band as well as the overwhelming majority of songs they did. Jack's "White room" is just fabulous! And don't you argue.
 wolfkiss wrote:
I'm not quite sure why the lyrics are taking such a beating.  So many complaints, I went to go read them, and found them full of imagery.  With ease I was able to imagine myself in that tense space of both wanting and not wanting a woman.

What you get from good lyrics or a good poem should be your own.  If you hear/read them and get nothing, that's shallowness on your part not that of the artist.
 
love this comment.
 buddy wrote:

Don't have to track them down, lived through them. (gotcha by 3 years   {#Wink}  )

I'd agree with you on Baker & Bonham.  But seriously...Paice & Mitchell?  Can't go there with you. Neil Peart, Keith Moon, Carl Palmer, and Bill Bruford are ahead of them on my list.  What drum community are talking about, btw?  Just askin'....
 
Around my drum school Mitchell is regarded as the best drummer of the classic rock era.

After that it gets a bit less definitive. 

Bonham was probably the most influential.

I do suggest you round up DVDs of Zeppelin and Purple from the early 70s and compare them to anything Baker has done.

He is just not in Bonham and Paice's league.

Peart is a different thing.  No question the most influential rock drummer of the last 30 years.

In terms of pure chops, though, Mitchell, Paice and Bonham would all blow him off the stage.  And I say that as a Canadian who grew up just up the road from the great Mr Peart.


 keller1 wrote:

For some perspective on where Ginger Baker stands in the pantheon of classic rock drummers, my suggestion is to track down some Zeppelin, Deep Purple, and Jimi Hendrix Experience DVDs.

The consensus in the drumming community is that Bonham, Paice and Mitchell were the big three in classic rock drumming.

Honorable mention to Moonie and Ringo for style and being exactly the right guy for their respeictive bands.

Baker isn't in the conversation.



 
Don't have to track them down, lived through them. (gotcha by 3 years   {#Wink}  )

I'd agree with you on Baker & Bonham.  But seriously...Paice & Mitchell?  Can't go there with you. Neil Peart, Keith Moon, Carl Palmer, and Bill Bruford are ahead of them on my list.  What drum community are talking about, btw?  Just askin'....


For some perspective on where Ginger Baker stands in the pantheon of classic rock drummers, my suggestion is to track down some Zeppelin, Deep Purple, and Jimi Hendrix Experience DVDs.

The consensus in the drumming community is that Bonham, Paice and Mitchell were the big three in classic rock drumming.

Honorable mention to Moonie and Ringo for style and being exactly the right guy for their respeictive bands.

Baker isn't in the conversation.



Very, very nice!
das  ist ja wirklich  legendär  !!  ginger baker  der große  j.bruce  genial  aber der Hammer  eric clapten Legende 
3 Jungs und soooo viel  MUSIC{#Bananajam}{#Drummer}{#Guitarist}  wirklich classic