[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]

What questions would you like to answer for the world? - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 16, 2024 - 8:47am
 
Wordle - daily game - geoff_morphini - Jul 16, 2024 - 8:41am
 
Trump - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 16, 2024 - 8:33am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - sunybuny - Jul 16, 2024 - 8:25am
 
NYTimes Connections - maryte - Jul 16, 2024 - 8:24am
 
NY Times Strands - Bill_J - Jul 16, 2024 - 8:00am
 
Name My Band - GeneP59 - Jul 16, 2024 - 7:19am
 
Bear! - Beaker - Jul 16, 2024 - 6:43am
 
July 2024 Photo Theme - Summer - MrDill - Jul 16, 2024 - 6:05am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Jul 16, 2024 - 6:03am
 
Musky Mythology - R_P - Jul 15, 2024 - 11:14pm
 
2024 Elections! - R_P - Jul 15, 2024 - 8:43pm
 
Project 2025 - Red_Dragon - Jul 15, 2024 - 5:05pm
 
Favorite Quotes - Isabeau - Jul 15, 2024 - 3:43pm
 
Rhetorical questions - Isabeau - Jul 15, 2024 - 3:41pm
 
kurtster's quiet vinyl - kurtster - Jul 15, 2024 - 1:56pm
 
Words that should be put on the substitutes bench for a year - Isabeau - Jul 15, 2024 - 12:25pm
 
The Truth About (Modern) Popular Music - Proclivities - Jul 15, 2024 - 8:18am
 
Israel - R_P - Jul 15, 2024 - 6:05am
 
Song of the Day - oldviolin - Jul 15, 2024 - 6:04am
 
Please don't ban me, but: Taylor Swift... - sunybuny - Jul 15, 2024 - 4:55am
 
Joe Biden - Beaker - Jul 14, 2024 - 5:05pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - Beaker - Jul 14, 2024 - 3:51pm
 
Things You Thought Today - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 14, 2024 - 3:35pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Jul 14, 2024 - 2:17pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Jul 14, 2024 - 12:52pm
 
Media Bias - Beaker - Jul 14, 2024 - 9:46am
 
what the hell, miamizsun? - oldviolin - Jul 14, 2024 - 7:51am
 
The Obituary Page - DaveInSaoMiguel - Jul 14, 2024 - 6:42am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 13, 2024 - 9:20pm
 
AH! There's an elephant in the room! - Red_Dragon - Jul 13, 2024 - 3:42pm
 
Outstanding Covers - DaveInSaoMiguel - Jul 13, 2024 - 12:49pm
 
Evolution! - R_P - Jul 13, 2024 - 10:34am
 
Climate Change - R_P - Jul 13, 2024 - 10:28am
 
Eclectic Sound-Drops - oldviolin - Jul 13, 2024 - 10:23am
 
What the hell OV? - oldviolin - Jul 13, 2024 - 10:03am
 
Europe - thisbody - Jul 12, 2024 - 11:35pm
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - Jul 12, 2024 - 9:59pm
 
RP on Mac Just Stopped Working - tourtelot - Jul 12, 2024 - 9:35pm
 
Are they married yet? YES THEY ARE! - Manbird - Jul 12, 2024 - 2:51pm
 
Tech & Science - Manbird - Jul 12, 2024 - 2:46pm
 
Classic TV Curiosities - Proclivities - Jul 12, 2024 - 12:50pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - simonchutchings - Jul 12, 2024 - 11:24am
 
Ukraine - R_P - Jul 12, 2024 - 10:48am
 
New Music - R_P - Jul 12, 2024 - 10:23am
 
USA! USA! USA! - R_P - Jul 12, 2024 - 9:35am
 
Florida - miamizsun - Jul 12, 2024 - 7:05am
 
Regarding Birds - Jiggz - Jul 12, 2024 - 1:41am
 
Strange signs, marquees, billboards, etc. - thisbody - Jul 11, 2024 - 10:36pm
 
Guns - Red_Dragon - Jul 11, 2024 - 3:44pm
 
Gotta Get Your Drink On - Antigone - Jul 11, 2024 - 2:36pm
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 11, 2024 - 2:05pm
 
Record Store Day - Proclivities - Jul 11, 2024 - 8:18am
 
What makes you smile? - Steely_D - Jul 11, 2024 - 5:12am
 
Derplahoma! - sunybuny - Jul 11, 2024 - 4:39am
 
Russia - thisbody - Jul 11, 2024 - 3:11am
 
France - thisbody - Jul 11, 2024 - 3:04am
 
Britain - thisbody - Jul 10, 2024 - 11:36pm
 
Good Idea / Bad Idea - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 10, 2024 - 4:39pm
 
How's the weather? - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 10, 2024 - 4:35pm
 
China - Red_Dragon - Jul 10, 2024 - 4:28pm
 
RP Daily Trivia Challenge - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 10, 2024 - 2:56pm
 
SCOTUS - Red_Dragon - Jul 10, 2024 - 2:20pm
 
Twitter and democracy - R_P - Jul 10, 2024 - 8:40am
 
Baseball, anyone? - Bill_J - Jul 9, 2024 - 8:58pm
 
Is RP stuck in a loop? - thisbody - Jul 9, 2024 - 3:51pm
 
COVID-19 - oldviolin - Jul 9, 2024 - 2:18pm
 
The Sound of Falling Water - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 9, 2024 - 2:04pm
 
Spambags on RP - GeneP59 - Jul 9, 2024 - 1:37pm
 
RP is stuck in repetitive loop of songs! WTH? - thisbody - Jul 9, 2024 - 1:29pm
 
Make Scott laugh - thisbody - Jul 9, 2024 - 11:33am
 
RightWingNutZ - R_P - Jul 9, 2024 - 11:09am
 
The Day the Sausage Died - thisbody - Jul 9, 2024 - 10:43am
 
Philosophy (Meaty Metaphysical Munchables!) - thisbody - Jul 9, 2024 - 10:41am
 
Best Funk ? - thisbody - Jul 9, 2024 - 10:22am
 
Index » Regional/Local » Elsewhere » Earthquake Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Post to this Topic
steeler

steeler Avatar

Location: Perched on the precipice of the cauldron of truth


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 10:19am

 geoff_morphini wrote:

 If you weren’t already aware, there is an event page the USGS develops (usually within 5 min of the earthquake). It is here https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea...

A couple of notable things 1) within that event page is a “Did you feel it?” Inquiry https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea.... This provides incredible intensity information to develop site attenuation models and such - please consider putting your info in it. 2) there have been over 109, 000 responses thus far! That amazing for a M4.8 event however, 3 things factor in a) lots of people available to experience event, b) shallow (less than 4 km deep (most western eq’s are 10 -15 km or greater and c) your rocks are old, strong and unbroken (like a good bell. The responses are more than 100 miles from the epicenter, I’ll bet people will report it over 200 miles away. That doesn’t happen in the west, our bell is not as strong. 3) Most New England earthquakes are caused by glacial rebound (not tectonics). You had km’s of ice sitting on the crust about 20 - 12 thousand years ago. That’s lots of weight. It depressed the crust. The ice suddenly melted (over a few thousand years) and the crust is still “bouncing back.” If you put a significant weight on rocks for a long period of time they will flex (elastically), if you remove that weight quickly they may respond in a brittle way (hence earthquake). 4) one other thing to note - the USGS provides a forecast of potential aftershocks over the next week - in your case you have a 16% chance of having a M4+ and a 46% chance of an M3+ It is very unlikely, but not impossible, that you will feel another the same size or greater.https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea...

There will be a lot of info to come. 

Very interesting. Thanks!

rgio

rgio Avatar

Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 9:36am

 geoff_morphini wrote:
Jrzy, did something alert you to the beginning of the shaking, like a banging sound, a pop or a jolt? The low rumble was likely the shear wave (accompanied by swaying motion). The sudden motion would be the primary (p wave). In smaller earthquakes most people don’t realize that’s what alerted them to the beginning of the event

Jrzy and I live pretty close to each other...and I heard it...a loud rumble...and then the platter of my turntable started banging into the "walls" of the deck behind me.  Given the rain, and the fact that a tree came down in the woods by my house, I was worried that one of the larger trees had fallen on my house.

geoff_morphini

geoff_morphini Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 9:08am

 islander wrote:


David Lee Roth running down the street singing "I'm your earthquake man, stop me when I'm passin' by"?


HA!
islander

islander Avatar

Location: West coast somewhere
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 9:06am

 geoff_morphini wrote:


Jrzy, did something alert you to the beginning of the shaking, like a banging sound, a pop or a jolt? The low rumble was likely the shear wave (accompanied by swaying motion). The sudden motion would be the primary (p wave). In smaller earthquakes most people don’t realize that’s what alerted them to the beginning of the event


David Lee Roth running down the street singing "I'm your earthquake man, stop me when I'm passin' by"?
geoff_morphini

geoff_morphini Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 9:00am

 JrzyTmata wrote:

we just had a 4.7 in northern New Jersey.
we felt a low rumble here in South Jersey. 



Jrzy, did something alert you to the beginning of the shaking, like a banging sound, a pop or a jolt? The low rumble was likely the shear wave (accompanied by swaying motion). The sudden motion would be the primary (p wave). In smaller earthquakes most people don’t realize that’s what alerted them to the beginning of the event
NeuroJoe

NeuroJoe Avatar

Location: Philly suburbs
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 8:47am

 geoff_morphini wrote:

 If you weren’t already aware, there is an event page the USGS develops (usually within 5 min of the earthquake). It is here https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea...

A couple of notable things 1) within that event page is a “Did you feel it?” Inquiry https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea.... This provides incredible intensity information to develop site attenuation models and such - please consider putting your info in it. 2) there have been over 109, 000 responses thus far! That amazing for a M4.8 event however, 3 things factor in a) lots of people available to experience event, b) shallow (less than 4 km deep (most western eq’s are 10 -15 km or greater and c) your rocks are old, strong and unbroken (like a good bell. The responses are more than 100 miles from the epicenter, I’ll bet people will report it over 200 miles away. That doesn’t happen in the west, our bell is not as strong. 3) Most New England earthquakes are caused by glacial rebound (not tectonics). You had km’s of ice sitting on the crust about 20 - 12 thousand years ago. That’s lots of weight. It depressed the crust. The ice suddenly melted (over a few thousand years) and the crust is still “bouncing back.” If you put a significant weight on rocks for a long period of time they will flex (elastically), if you remove that weight quickly they may respond in a brittle way (hence earthquake). 4) one other thing to note - the USGS provides a forecast of potential aftershocks over the next week - in your case you have a 16% chance of having a M4+ and a 46% chance of an M3+ It is very unlikely, but not impossible, that you will feel another the same size or greater.https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea...

There will be a lot of info to come. 


Super cool, thanks!
geoff_morphini

geoff_morphini Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 8:37am

 JrzyTmata wrote:

we just had a 4.7 in northern New Jersey.
we felt a low rumble here in South Jersey. 


 If you weren’t already aware, there is an event page the USGS develops (usually within 5 min of the earthquake). It is here https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea...

A couple of notable things 1) within that event page is a “Did you feel it?” Inquiry https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea.... This provides incredible intensity information to develop site attenuation models and such - please consider putting your info in it. 2) there have been over 109, 000 responses thus far! That amazing for a M4.8 event however, 3 things factor in a) lots of people available to experience event, b) shallow (less than 4 km deep (most western eq’s are 10 -15 km or greater and c) your rocks are old, strong and unbroken (like a good bell. The responses are more than 100 miles from the epicenter, I’ll bet people will report it over 200 miles away. That doesn’t happen in the west, our bell is not as strong. 3) Most New England earthquakes are caused by glacial rebound (not tectonics). You had km’s of ice sitting on the crust about 20 - 12 thousand years ago. That’s lots of weight. It depressed the crust. The ice suddenly melted (over a few thousand years) and the crust is still “bouncing back.” If you put a significant weight on rocks for a long period of time they will flex (elastically), if you remove that weight quickly they may respond in a brittle way (hence earthquake). 4) one other thing to note - the USGS provides a forecast of potential aftershocks over the next week - in your case you have a 16% chance of having a M4+ and a 46% chance of an M3+ It is very unlikely, but not impossible, that you will feel another the same size or greater.https://earthquake.usgs.gov/ea...

There will be a lot of info to come. 
Bill_J

Bill_J Avatar



Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 7:44am

 JrzyTmata wrote:

we just had a 4.7 in northern New Jersey.
we felt a low rumble here in South Jersey. 


Our house was shaking here just north of your border.
JrzyTmata

JrzyTmata Avatar



Posted: Apr 5, 2024 - 7:41am

we just had a 4.7 in northern New Jersey.
we felt a low rumble here in South Jersey. 
NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 1:13pm

 geoff_morphini wrote:


Sort of my feeling about Bard's response. Could have asked the same for the US west coast. 

Ignimbrite flare-up - I'd like to see that paper. The IFU the western US experienced (ca. 20-30 Ma) was due to the Farallon slab collapsing into the mantle and really hot asthenospheric material contacting continental crust...boom!  

As to the question about future prospects of the diminishing Alpine fault, I don't know. I'll have to look for another example of opposed polarity subduction zones mating

It is definitely geology on steroids in Aotearoa

I guess that is a band name  

I'll try and find that paper for you. I think it was from this year.
geoff_morphini

geoff_morphini Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 1:08pm

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:


ha, interesting what that punches out.  Basically very bland.   
The most recent paper I read is that NZ is currently in the middle or even beginnings of an ignimbrite flare-up so I wouldn't go with relative stability, unless you take some ridiculously short time-frame for geological processes. The rest is pretty mundane stuff that could apply just about anywhere on the Pacific rim.
The actually reality is that NZ geology is scary as all hell but equally fascinating.



Sort of my feeling about Bard's response. Could have asked the same for the US west coast. 

Ignimbrite flare-up - I'd like to see that paper. The IFU the western US experienced (ca. 20-30 Ma) was due to the Farallon slab collapsing into the mantle and really hot asthenospheric material contacting continental crust...boom!  

As to the question about future prospects of the diminishing Alpine fault, I don't know. I'll have to look for another example of opposed polarity subduction zones mating. 

It is definitely geology on steroids in Aotearoa
NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 12:18pm

 miamizsun wrote:

thank you bard!

New Zealand is located in the Pacific Ring of Fire, a region of intense volcanic and seismic activity. The country is currently experiencing a period of relative stability, but this is expected to change in the future.

Over the next million years, New Zealand is expected to experience a number of tectonic events, including:

  • Earthquakes: New Zealand is currently experiencing a number of earthquakes each year, and this number is expected to increase in the future. The largest earthquakes in New Zealand are capable of causing significant damage and loss of life.
  • Volcanic eruptions: New Zealand is also home to a number of volcanoes, and these volcanoes are expected to erupt in the future. Volcanic eruptions can cause significant damage and loss of life, as well as release harmful gases into the atmosphere.
  • Tsunamis: New Zealand is also located in an area that is prone to tsunamis. Tsunami waves can cause significant damage and loss of life, as well as inundate coastal areas.

These tectonic events are a natural part of the Earth's evolution, but they can also pose a significant threat to the people and infrastructure of New Zealand. It is important to be aware of the risks associated with these events and to take steps to mitigate them.

There are a number of things that can be done to mitigate the risks associated with tectonic events in New Zealand. These include:

  • Building codes: Building codes in New Zealand are designed to withstand earthquakes and other tectonic events. These codes can help to reduce the damage caused by these events.
  • Emergency plans: New Zealand has a number of emergency plans in place to deal with the aftermath of tectonic events. These plans can help to reduce the loss of life and property.
  • Education: It is important to educate the people of New Zealand about the risks associated with tectonic events and how to stay safe. This education can help to reduce the impact of these events.






ha, interesting what that punches out.  Basically very bland.   
The most recent paper I read is that NZ is currently in the middle or even beginnings of an ignimbrite flare-up so I wouldn't go with relative stability, unless you take some ridiculously short time-frame for geological processes. The rest is pretty mundane stuff that could apply just about anywhere on the Pacific rim.
The actually reality is that NZ geology is scary as all hell but equally fascinating.

miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3283.1 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 12:00pm

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:


not really a triple junction is it?  what is going to happen here over the next million years or so do you think? You basically have two slabs subducting in opposite directions racing towards each other obliquely on strike-slip fault (albeit with a bit of horizontal movement tossed in). The bit in the middle is obviously going to be deformed every which way to Sunday, (it already is) but sooner or later those subducting slabs are going to meet each other at depth. What happens then? Do they stick? Will some kind of transform fault form and one of the plates start subducting somewhere else? Are there any precedents for this kind of thing? sorry, lots of questions, I know., but it is hard to envisage.

thank you bard!

New Zealand is located in the Pacific Ring of Fire, a region of intense volcanic and seismic activity. The country is currently experiencing a period of relative stability, but this is expected to change in the future.

Over the next million years, New Zealand is expected to experience a number of tectonic events, including:

  • Earthquakes: New Zealand is currently experiencing a number of earthquakes each year, and this number is expected to increase in the future. The largest earthquakes in New Zealand are capable of causing significant damage and loss of life.
  • Volcanic eruptions: New Zealand is also home to a number of volcanoes, and these volcanoes are expected to erupt in the future. Volcanic eruptions can cause significant damage and loss of life, as well as release harmful gases into the atmosphere.
  • Tsunamis: New Zealand is also located in an area that is prone to tsunamis. Tsunami waves can cause significant damage and loss of life, as well as inundate coastal areas.

These tectonic events are a natural part of the Earth's evolution, but they can also pose a significant threat to the people and infrastructure of New Zealand. It is important to be aware of the risks associated with these events and to take steps to mitigate them.

There are a number of things that can be done to mitigate the risks associated with tectonic events in New Zealand. These include:

  • Building codes: Building codes in New Zealand are designed to withstand earthquakes and other tectonic events. These codes can help to reduce the damage caused by these events.
  • Emergency plans: New Zealand has a number of emergency plans in place to deal with the aftermath of tectonic events. These plans can help to reduce the loss of life and property.
  • Education: It is important to educate the people of New Zealand about the risks associated with tectonic events and how to stay safe. This education can help to reduce the impact of these events.





NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 11:51am

 geoff_morphini wrote:


That is a top notch crew of authors, know many of them really well. It is certainly not a simple plate boundary.


not really a triple junction is it?  what is going to happen here over the next million years or so do you think? You basically have two slabs subducting in opposite directions racing towards each other obliquely on strike-slip fault (albeit with a bit of horizontal movement tossed in). The bit in the middle is obviously going to be deformed every which way to Sunday, (it already is) but sooner or later those subducting slabs are going to meet each other at depth. What happens then? Do they stick? Will some kind of transform fault form and one of the plates start subducting somewhere else? Are there any precedents for this kind of thing? sorry, lots of questions, I know., but it is hard to envisage.
geoff_morphini

geoff_morphini Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 9:34am

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

what a train wreck

3d map of NZ's fault systems



That is a top notch crew of authors, know many of them really well. It is certainly not a simple plate boundary.
NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 23, 2023 - 3:50am

what a train wreck

3d map of NZ's fault systems
Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 13, 2023 - 8:07am

A friend’s husband has been deployed over in Turkey. He’s retired from search and rescue and was a first responder at the Pentagon on 9-11. 
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3283.1 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 13, 2023 - 8:05am

thought i just heard that a six year old girl (still alive after 170 hours or so) was pulled from the rubble
amazing...
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3283.1 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 7, 2023 - 5:19pm

 Isabeau wrote:


It is. TWO massive quakes of similar magnitude. Thousands dead or missing. 

These are the stories that should keep us grateful.

 
unbelievable video coming out of turkey/syria 
just one example



Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 7, 2023 - 3:09pm

 miamizsun wrote:

It is. TWO massive quakes of similar magnitude. Thousands dead or missing. 

These are the stories that should keep us grateful.
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next