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Amy Winehouse — You Know I'm No Good
Album: Back To Black
Avg rating:
7.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3389









Released: 2006
Length: 4:09
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Meet you downstairs in the bar and hurt
Your rolled up sleeves and your skull t-shirt
You say, "What did you do with him today?"
And sniff me out like I was Tanqueray
'Cause you're my fella, my guy
Hand me your Stella and fly
By the time I'm out the door
You tear me down like Roger Moore

I cheated myself
Like I knew I would
I told you, I was trouble
You know that I'm no good

Upstairs in bed with my ex boy
He's in a place but I can't get joy
Thinking on you in the final throes
This is when my buzzer goes
Run out to meet you, chips and pitta
You say "When we're married" cause you're not bitter
"There'll be none of him no more,"
I cried for you on the kitchen floor

I cheated myself
Like I knew I would
I told you I was trouble
You know that I'm no good

Sweet reunion, Jamaica and Spain
We're like how we were again
I'm in the tub, you on the seat
Lick your lips as I soak my feet
Then you notice the c-carpet burn
My stomach drops and my guts churn
You shrug and it's the worst
Who truly stuck the knife in first

I cheated myself
Like I knew I would
I told you I was trouble
You know that I'm no good

I cheated myself
Like I knew I would
I told you I was trouble
Yeah, you know that I'm no good
Comments (478)add comment
you cheated yourself. . .. 
Oh dear lord what a loss. The girl still had so much to do.
Her voice is brilliant - and the Dap Kings backing her are brilliant-er.
 walter22 wrote:



To me it is the combination of the drums and bass. The bass enhances the groove of the drums. Listen for when the bass drops out, the drums lose some of the groove.


yeah, that's pretty cool,  i hadn't noticed before! i love it anyway.
this is one of my fav's from her.
 ScottishWillie wrote:

I somehow hadn't noticed before but the drumming is really key to this track!




To me it is the combination of the drums and bass. The bass enhances the groove of the drums. Listen for when the bass drops out, the drums lose some of the groove.
 NeuroJoe wrote:


Bill's link archived here: 

https://web.archive.org/web/20...

Bump.

Excellent sidebar on how humans hear, and how we may have reached a limit for in our efforts to continuously improve digital recording.   Thanks, BillG and Willliam!!!

 garyevans wrote:

It's Sunday, October 28, 2007 and I have two tickets to see Amy Winehouse at the Palladium in Cologne. The ticket seller said I'd probably not see her as she would be too drunk to get in stage. 
Amy had reached the status of Godess in my mind. Her voice, her lyrics, her upbringing, like me, in London drew me like a magnet. When she did get on stage, she cut a tiny figure, petrified by 4000 fans and stiff as a board. Two men onstage danced crazily next to her to compensate. Her asshole of a man, Blake, stood stage left and she kept running off to hug him.
I didn't care that she was half off her head, she had that gift: her voice, and she rang like an exotic bird trapped in a cage that night. Your candle burned out too soon as you went back to black forever.

Goodbye Amy. A nightingale no longer singing.



Such a sad story. What an amazing voice.  She was so talented.  No, she wasn't talented, she was magnificent.  But, fame, being in front of crowds, her past life.  She struggled.  She sang about it with truth.  Covering up our pain through addiction is such a familiar human reaction.  Some addictions are more damaging and dangerous than others.  Unfortunately, her's eventually killed her, even though she knew it would.  We wanted her.  But she couldn't internalize that enough to escape those awful demons.  

Bless her.  She suffered.  And is still loved!
appreciated her music and talent but cannot rate this higher as I feel that she believed the title of this tune.  such a sad soul
 garyevans wrote:

It's Sunday, October 28, 2007 and I have two tickets to see Amy Winehouse at the Palladium in Cologne. The ticket seller said I'd probably not see her as she would be too drunk to get in stage. 
Amy had reached the status of Godess in my mind. Her voice, her lyrics, her upbringing, like me, in London drew me like a magnet. When she did get on stage, she cut a tiny figure, petrified by 4000 fans and stiff as a board. Two men onstage danced crazily next to her to compensate. Her asshole of a man, Blake, stood stage left and she kept running off to hug him.
I didn't care that she was half off her head, she had that gift: her voice, and she rang like an exotic bird trapped in a cage that night. Your candle burned out too soon as you went back to black forever.

Goodbye Amy. A nightingale no longer singing.



Interesting story, this is why sometimes I read comments.
 sfoster66 wrote:

This user doesn't seem to come around these parts any longer, but holy lordy, could this post be more cringy at point?  Good lesson to us all, don't leave off-handed nasty comments laying around about an actual living-breathing person that will continue to demonstrate a lack of humanity to all sometime down the line.  Critique the music, but maybe try to stay away from jamming one's thumb into the eye of their weaknesses.  Amy died because she couldn't deal with the world, not because she didn't want to try.  Tragedy, not comedy.
Definitely a tragedy. It's pretty obvious the people around her contributed mightily to her demise. Not unlike a number of other tragic stories in music.
c.

 sfoster66 wrote:

This user doesn't seem to come around these parts any longer, but holy lordy, could this post be more cringy at point?  Good lesson to us all, don't leave off-handed nasty comments laying around about an actual living-breathing person that will continue to demonstrate a lack of humanity to all sometime down the line.  Critique the music, but maybe try to stay away from jamming one's thumb into the eye of their weaknesses.  Amy died because she couldn't deal with the world, not because she didn't want to try.  Tragedy, not comedy.



She was a sensitive artist in a cut throat coke fueled industry. It was never going to end well.
 dwlangham wrote:

You are correct. The arrangements for this, "Rehab" and "Back to Black" are excellent.


Give props to the Dap Kings they were her band for this recording. They also were the studio band for Sharon Jones.  Such a great sound.
EXCELLENT!!  There are only 2 tunes by her on the RP playlist.  PLEASE ADD MORE!!  Thank you!
 sfoster66 wrote:

This user doesn't seem to come around these parts any longer, but holy lordy, could this post be more cringy at point?  Good lesson to us all, don't leave off-handed nasty comments laying around about a actual living-breathing person that will continue to demonstrate a lack of humanity to all sometime down the line.  Critique the music, but maybe try to stay away from jamming one's thumb into the eye of their weaknesses.  Amy died because she couldn't deal with the world, not because she didn't want to try.  Tragedy, not comedy.



I Agree totally!!!
 petercroob wrote:

The album is genius . . . so who's starting the death pool?


This user doesn't seem to come around these parts any longer, but holy lordy, could this post be more cringy at point?  Good lesson to us all, don't leave off-handed nasty comments laying around about an actual living-breathing person that will continue to demonstrate a lack of humanity to all sometime down the line.  Critique the music, but maybe try to stay away from jamming one's thumb into the eye of their weaknesses.  Amy died because she couldn't deal with the world, not because she didn't want to try.  Tragedy, not comedy.
Lyrics correction: “lickle carpet burn”.

One of the greatest songs by one of the greatest talents of the last 20 years.
Please something from her first album Frank as well.  When she was fresh and full of promise, before the downward spiral
Thanks RP.
The more I hear this tune, the more I LOVE it!!!         ...Tragic life!  ...May she rest in peace!
 gregskrtic wrote:


neither should your life be defined by your grammar ...


Does grammar include capitalization?
 westslope wrote:

8 for the voice.



I give a 10 for the voice.... LOL--10 for the whole package!!!
 fredriley wrote:

This is Amy in my mind, a woman who lived life to the full, who was sexy and enjoyed her sex. Tragedic, sure, but I don't think her life should be defined by its ending.



neither should your life be defined by your grammar ...
EXCELLENT!
This is Amy in my mind, a woman who lived life to the full, who was sexy and enjoyed her sex. Tragedic, sure, but I don't think her life should be defined by its ending.
Her death was a major......horror! She was fantastic!
 ScottishWillie wrote:

I somehow hadn't noticed before but the drumming is really key to this track!


You are correct. The arrangements for this, "Rehab" and "Back to Black" are excellent.
I somehow hadn't noticed before but the drumming is really key to this track!
Boris & the Nut Nuts - They tried to make me pay for refurb...
It's Sunday, October 28, 2007 and I have two tickets to see Amy Winehouse at the Palladium in Cologne. The ticket seller said I'd probably not see her as she would be too drunk to get in stage. 
Amy had reached the status of Godess in my mind. Her voice, her lyrics, her upbringing, like me, in London drew me like a magnet. When she did get on stage, she cut a tiny figure, petrified by 4000 fans and stiff as a board. Two men onstage danced crazily next to her to compensate. Her asshole of a man, Blake, stood stage left and she kept running off to hug him.
I didn't care that she was half off her head, she had that gift: her voice, and she rang like an exotic bird trapped in a cage that night. Your candle burned out too soon as you went back to black forever.

Goodbye Amy. A nightingale no longer singing.
 BillG wrote:

Actually the problem here is an over-abundance of analog distortion, not digital clipping. It was a deliberate choice by the album's engineer(s) & producer. It's reminiscent of a lot of badly-recorded 60s soul & rock — probably a lot of vintage gear, mishandled in the same way that it was back in the day.

As for Neil's views on "high resolution sound":  https://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html (audiophiles should stay away from that article if they don't want any pesky science interfering with their opinions). 
 

Bill's link archived here: 

https://web.archive.org/web/20...
 cakkafracle wrote:
Amy Winehouse is fucking brilliant. I didn't give her a chance for YEARS due to my impression of her personal life (and sadly public life).

but I saw this and my heart burst like a damn dam.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbVp09E1LRg




The day she came to Dingle



... and in 2004 ...




I like her. A sad story for sure. 
+1
 Jelani wrote:
 MJdub wrote:
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.

emotional/mental one, which is where the eating disorder came from in the first place. Eating disorders are initially symptoms of something much deeper and more critical, which let go on for too long, become their own disease. So, this might have all been addressed and possibly 'remedied' at a much earlier stage. Then the drugs come in. What a much more potent salve to the underlying emotional trauma(s)! So,physical deficiencies combined with the extra potent escape mechanism was too much. Sad that it all could possibly been avoided if people around her , such as her family and friends were able to recognize what was going on and coaxed her in the right direction early on. Very sad. 

 
Interesting person and life.  Her great great grandparents where Belarus Jews.


Patti Smith has a tribute song on her Banga album.  Good release by her by the way and unfortunately only one song on RP from that album {#Stupid}.

"
This is the girl
This the blind that turned in wine
This is the wine of the house, it is said
This is the girl who yearned to be heard
So much for cradling a smouldering bird..."
 BillG wrote:

Actually the problem here is an over-abundance of analog distortion, not digital clipping. It was a deliberate choice by the album's engineer(s) & producer. It's reminiscent of a lot of badly-recorded 60s soul & rock — probably a lot of vintage gear, mishandled in the same way that it was back in the day.

As for Neil's views on "high resolution sound":  https://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html (audiophiles should stay away from that article if they don't want any pesky science interfering with their opinions). 

 
Thanks for the article, BillG!  Science IS knowledge!!!

And outside of the tragedy that was Amy's life, this album is freaking awesome, this track nearly a 10 for me (and the carpet burn lyric....yeah well.... ;-) )

 GuiltyFeat wrote:
עליה השלום

 
זיכרונה לברכה
 westslope wrote:
8 for the voice.

 
...and another 1 at least for the honest lyrics. What I loved about Winehouse was that she sung about her life, warts and all, sex, drugs, booze and all. Only she could have made a hit out of a song complaining about her mates forever scrounging blow off her or, as with this song, casual but passionate sex, carpet burns and all.
 Jelani wrote:
 MJdub wrote:
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.

 I haven't seen this doc yet, I'm sure it's great and I look forward to seeing it. You mention that Amy had "health complications from eating disorders". Well, it's kind of sad to hear this, because most likely the biggest health complication an eating disorder indicates is an emotional/mental one, which is where the eating disorder came from in the first place. Eating disorders are initially symptoms of something much deeper and more critical, which let go on for too long, become their own disease. So, this might have all been addressed and possibly 'remedied' at a much earlier stage. Then the drugs come in. What a much more potent salve to the underlying emotional trauma(s)! So,physical deficiencies combined with the extra potent escape mechanism was too much. Sad that it all could possibly been avoided if people around her , such as her family and friends were able to recognize what was going on and coaxed her in the right direction early on. Very sad. 

 
"But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved".   Thank you for you compassion and insight. Your words are so true.  —  from a guy in recovery.
8 for the voice.
 MJdub wrote:
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.

 I haven't seen this doc yet, I'm sure it's great and I look forward to seeing it. You mention that Amy had "health complications from eating disorders". Well, it's kind of sad to hear this, because most likely the biggest health complication an eating disorder indicates is an emotional/mental one, which is where the eating disorder came from in the first place. Eating disorders are initially symptoms of something much deeper and more critical, which let go on for too long, become their own disease. So, this might have all been addressed and possibly 'remedied' at a much earlier stage. Then the drugs come in. What a much more potent salve to the underlying emotional trauma(s)! So,physical deficiencies combined with the extra potent escape mechanism was too much. Sad that it all could possibly been avoided if people around her , such as her family and friends were able to recognize what was going on and coaxed her in the right direction early on. Very sad. 
Yeah and it did not help being taken advantage of by everyone around her! {#Skull}
עליה השלום
 MJdub wrote:
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.


I just tuned in and this is the first time I think I've heard Amy Winehouse on RP, and one of my favorite songs at that.
Last month on an airplane ride back home from Burkina Faso where I work, I watched the Amy documentary which I heard won the Oscar for best doc.  It was a great film because it brought us all in to her life, to see who she really was— before she was a star, her rise to fame, and the tragic fall.  What affected me most in the film was when she went to a tropical island to recover and retreat with her closest friends and family, and they were riding horses on the beach and having fun, and although Amy was drinking too much, she was not drugging and was clearly on a road to recovery.  Yet her father shows up with a TV camera crew, to take advantage of this moment, to make more content out of Amy's already shattered life.  It was so utterly insensitive and disrespectful that I realized her father was a big part of her demise.  The TV crew then captures Amy's father pressuring Amy to take a fucking photo with some fans who recognized her on the beach and Amy doesn't want to, she's chilling out with her peeps, and her father basically says come and give these people the little something that's going to make them happy.  What about Amy's happiness?  Seemed to take a back seat to her father's intentions of how he wanted to profit from her.
Anyway, I thought I'd check out the comments of this song to maybe just say how important a film this is for music lovers, and how much RP listeners would enjoy it.  I wondered if there would be any comments about it. Surprise, well actually, I'm not surprised.  I've been amazed at how well informed and knowledgeable the RP listening audience is- Bill, you don't have an easy job pleasing all these discerning people, yet you and your lady seem to do it so effortlessly.  Big up.
And btw, I was a little late to the Amy Winehouse party.  The first time I heard this song was on the Showtime series "Diary of a Call Girl" which was a funny, racy TV series.  It wasn't until I watched a video of Amy perform in concert in London (drunk as a skunk, it was near the end and really sad) that I realized she sang this song.  Late last year I bought Back to Black and think it's a great album.
I agree Amy is not a pop star, but a completely natural jazz singer, a chanteuse, a Billy Holiday, and the world has lost another bright star with her passing. Rest in peace Amy, you were better without all of us adoring you and being so fascinated by you. Thank you for the gifts of your music and your soulful voice that you left us, that lives in us, despite all that it cost you, and we know sweet Amy, that it cost you all... {#Group-hug}

Robert Harris did a very insightful profile of her career here on CBC radio last summer: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thesundayedition/greece-at-the-crossroads-too-much-sitting-can-be-bad-for-you-utopia-on-the-prairie-amy-winehouse-1.3157555/amy-winehouse-1.3165471

 
 MJdub wrote:
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.

 
Excellent commentary, thanks for sharing!

Amy's "so boring without drugs" comment hit me very hard as well.  It hurts to imagine how addicts reach the point where they can no longer feel joy when clean and sober.  Such a shame...
 BBoyes wrote:

Nicely put!

 
Agreed. I haven't seen the doc yet, but really, really want to.
 MJdub wrote:
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.

 
Nicely put!
{#Headache} acoustic hazardous waste
Last weekend I watched the documentary Amy — about her career and downfall.  I am generally not very interested in biopics, and I've also never been a fan or really listened to Amy's music, but it was a great film.  They did a very good job of conveying the magnitude of the tragedy and portraying Amy as a real human.  

When a celebrity musician dies, many of us have a tendency, especially if we are not very familiar with the person or their work, to think something along the lines of, "Oh well, another stupid dead musician."  But all drug addicts start out as normal people who love and are loved, and all the stories are tragic for those involved.  

We all remember the air of cynicism and how Amy was dragged through the mud in the media after she died, as is the custom.  But I don't think anyone deserves that, regardless of what poor decisions they've made.  The movie makes it seem like there was a fairly short span of time between her first trying harder drugs and her demise.  It seemed like she got in really deep really fast, and then struggled for a few years trying to recover but couldn't manage to escape.  Her addiction may have been compounded by the influence of a few people close to her, and apparently her body was unable to handle the drugs because of health complications from eating disorders that I was unaware of (another awfully tragic facet of the story).  The part that really got me in the feels was the scene where she had just won the Grammy for best album, and had been clean for a little while, and in the middle of the party turned to her friend and said, "This is so boring without drugs."

At the very least, the film opened my eyes to the fact that Amy was not a pop singer with a bit of a "jazzy flavor".  She was a bona fide jazz singer of the highest caliber, who happened to dabble a bit in pop music toward the end of her career.  I still don't think I would consider myself a fan, but I have a much higher respect for her talent.  I would highly recommend the film and you can count me among the people that is sad she's gone.
What a pity she left us so soon, so good live.
 Bobert_ParkCity wrote:

amb = ambien?

 
Subtle!
 hugogdt wrote:
Here is where I agree with Neil Young, the real analog sound would do so good to this song!

 
Actually the problem here is an over-abundance of analog distortion, not digital clipping. It was a deliberate choice by the album's engineer(s) & producer. It's reminiscent of a lot of badly-recorded 60s soul & rock — probably a lot of vintage gear, mishandled in the same way that it was back in the day.

As for Neil's views on "high resolution sound":  https://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html (audiophiles should stay away from that article if they don't want any pesky science interfering with their opinions). 
Gone too soon!
 blackaddermrbean wrote:
its a good song, but overplayed so much between you and the radio stations by me.
 
{#Yes}
its a good song, but overplayed so much between you and the radio stations by me.
Here is where I agree with Neil Young, the real analog sound would do so good to this song!
Sounds like 'samples' in there, but I read it's all original production. great retro sounds.
Love her music. 
What a shame, so talented girl. Drugs and alcohol sucks :( 
 amb599 wrote:
It's okay, but I think she can do better.  I look forward to her future work.

 
amb = ambien?
 MJdub wrote:

I would love to hear that.  I've Googled a bit and apparently I'm not alone.  I sort of missed out on Amy when she was around; wasn't really my cup of tea but it eventually caught my attention here on RP and once I turned it up I was rather disappointed.  I was thinking about picking up a copy of the album but now I don't think I will.
I get that they were going for a retro, almost lo-fi sound, and I know they have to compress everything for the radio and the kids' tastes these days, but it doesn't need to sound like this.  I suppose it is mainly the mix, but it even sounds like there's clipping on individual tracks (i.e. bass), not just the overall mix, which almost makes it sound like it was overloaded in the original recording.  Either way someone screwed up, IMO.  If this sonic mayhem happened solely in the mastering process, someone's career needs to end!  The full mix doesn't seem too squashed though so it sounds like things went wrong pre-master.

 
Interesting analysis.  I didn't hear this until I read this.  Agree, it sounds like the Top 40 mixes my 14 year old insists we listen to.
 BillG wrote:

I keep hoping for a remastering of this — but none so far.  I agree — the recording quality of this is dreadful.

 
I would love to hear that.  I've Googled a bit and apparently I'm not alone.  I sort of missed out on Amy when she was around; wasn't really my cup of tea but it eventually caught my attention here on RP and once I turned it up I was rather disappointed.  I was thinking about picking up a copy of the album but now I don't think I will.
I get that they were going for a retro, almost lo-fi sound, and I know they have to compress everything for the radio and the kids' tastes these days, but it doesn't need to sound like this.  I suppose it is mainly the mix, but it even sounds like there's clipping on individual tracks (i.e. bass), not just the overall mix, which almost makes it sound like it was overloaded in the original recording.  Either way someone screwed up, IMO.  If this sonic mayhem happened solely in the mastering process, someone's career needs to end!  The full mix doesn't seem too squashed though so it sounds like things went wrong pre-master.
 MJdub wrote:
I wonder what she could have done with a decent mix.  Great music, but my lord does it sound like garbage.  Good music is supposed to sound better the louder you turn it up.

 
I keep hoping for a remastering of this — but none so far.  I agree — the recording quality of this is dreadful.
The audio of this file sounds distorted.
Of course it kind of fits her messy life. 
I wonder what she could have done with a decent mix.  Great music, but my lord does it sound like garbage.  Good music is supposed to sound better the louder you turn it up.
 amb599 wrote:
It's okay, but I think she can do better.  I look forward to her future work.

 
Sarcasm, it's a wonderful thang......

 amb599 wrote:
It's okay, but I think she can do better.  I look forward to her future work.

 
FIY : she's dead, don't expect much beside maybe dome demos that will be "found" and edited for a posthume release in a few years... 
It's okay, but I think she can do better.  I look forward to her future work.
Love the Dap Kings. What a house band, eh?
 ChrisVIII wrote:

A sacrifice ?! you really think she died like that thinking generously that it would help someone ?! That she would become an example of failure ?! Do you really think she voluntarily went that far and died of an overdose so it could teach fellow addicts ?! Do you even understand the meaning of what you wrote ?

It's more likely she was only thinking about herself that night and probably didn't anticipate it would go that far and she wouldn't wake up.
Stop here with idolatry, it's the sad story of a drug addict and alcoholic who could have reached higher if she had managed to win over her addictions but it's not a sacrifice and it has nothing glorious or glamorous.
Someone else here mentioned that a lot of people could also do better and become someone if they were helped out of their addictions. I don't think they wouldn't necessarily all turn out to be genius, but they should be helped out regardless of how high they would reach, even getting them to have a "low rated" job would be worth it, anything that would enable them to be a person and not the shadow of whoever they are supposed to be. 
 

 
I don't think he meant it quite literally in that way. It is unfortunate her demons got the best of her, like so many others in our society, whether fighting addiction, depression or many of the other problems that seem to so easy to those who don't understand their battle. No, Amy didn't sacrifice herself that others might be saved from following in her tragic footsteps. At the same time if someone looks at what the ravages of the illness of addiction did to her and decide to not follow down that path, then at least the tragedy will have some silver lining.

The bigger question becomes when a child comes into this world, how do we determine which of those will be brilliant scientists, or artists of the first caliber, what do we do with those who show a propensity toward addiction? A demonstration for both?

It strikes me that apparently we have some sort of fuel that drives us. And where most seem to have a truly limited amount and manage to stretch it out over a decent run, there are some who seem that they are just destined to burn out everything they have quickly, flame out in a supernova leaving behind remnants and echoes, and the amazement of those around them. We've all seen these flameouts and supernovae in the works, but we're still speechless when the realization hits and that person is no longer with us.

It'd be nice to find those formula to fix the problems if the brilliance could be preserved or even if it were tempered so they stay for the long haul, but that's just how the human crumbles.

Anyway, Merry Christmas from a non-Christian in Louisville. Think of those in your life on the periphery who could stand to have a connection, a family, a friend, and hold them tight. Some just need an anchor, something to help them through that which drags them away, some just an ear. Reach out and connect. Maybe the one you save could show us the heights Amy Winehouse or Vincent Van Gogh or countless others could've reached had they not lost their battles.
 Papa_Smurf wrote:
And to you Amy Thank you for sacrificing yourself so that others, more ignorant than yourself, could learn from the loosing hand you were dealt in life, for some of us our loss, your sacrifice is not in vain.

 
A sacrifice ?! you really think she died like that thinking generously that it would help someone ?! That she would become an example of failure ?! Do you really think she voluntarily went that far and died of an overdose so it could teach fellow addicts ?! Do you even understand the meaning of what you wrote ?

It's more likely she was only thinking about herself that night and probably didn't anticipate it would go that far and she wouldn't wake up.
Stop here with idolatry, it's the sad story of a drug addict and alcoholic who could have reached higher if she had managed to win over her addictions but it's not a sacrifice and it has nothing glorious or glamorous.
Someone else here mentioned that a lot of people could also do better and become someone if they were helped out of their addictions. I don't think they wouldn't necessarily all turn out to be genius, but they should be helped out regardless of how high they would reach, even getting them to have a "low rated" job would be worth it, anything that would enable them to be a person and not the shadow of whoever they are supposed to be. 
 
 jhorton wrote:
Still a 3.

 
Hey man, it goes like this: 1 is worst, 10 is best. Nevermind, next time you ask would you?
great voice and talent gone too soon. 
Have to reduce my rating to 6 - really over this song, and it's really just a sad commentary on her depression and low self-esteem ending in tragedy.  
{#Headache}
 Byronape wrote:

You are missing the point.  It isn't that we shouldn't recognize the passing of an argueably talented singer and songwriter, it's that we need to use her as an example of what can happen if addiction goes untreated.  That bum on the street with train tracks on his arm and a bottle in his hand could be the next John Lennon or Albert Einstein if given a chance. 

And before all the socially conservatives jump on my ass and accuse me of trying to give away their hard earned money to worthless people, I'm not advocating kicking you out of your house for them and giving the bum your job.  I just thing that if we funnelled the money wasted on drug enforcement and the cost of the imprisonment of addicts to a proven drug treatment system, everyone would be better off.  Less crime, less drugs on the street, less overcrowding in the prisons, less actually dangerous people getting let out of prison early due to overcrowding, and most importantly, less people dying due to lack of treatment and education.
Great song.
You are warmly invited over to the forum threads, where like this comment, we write on issues besides "Song Comments". 


I love this tune. It's a great piece to have in the RP lineup. Thanks, Bill!
 Byronape wrote:

You are missing the point.  It isn't that we shouldn't recognize the passing of an argueably talented singer and songwriter, it's that we need to use her as an example of what can happen if addiction goes untreated.  That bum on the street with train tracks on his arm and a bottle in his hand could be the next John Lennon or Albert Einstein if given a chance. 

And before all the socially conservatives jump on my ass and accuse me of trying to give away their hard earned money to worthless people, I'm not advocating kicking you out of your house for them and giving the bum your job.  I just thing that if we funnelled the money wasted on drug enforcement and the cost of the imprisonment of addicts to a proven drug treatment system, everyone would be better off.  Less crime, less drugs on the street, less overcrowding in the prisons, less actually dangerous people getting let out of prison early due to overcrowding, and most importantly, less people dying due to lack of treatment and education.

 


As long as prisons are big business -- and they are BIG business - this will never happen.  We WANT to throw people in jail - $$$$$
 jhorton wrote:
Still a 3.

 
Nothing personal but this is the kind of rating/comment that makes me wonder if I'm from a different planet.
 Byronape wrote:

You are missing the point.  It isn't that we shouldn't recognize the passing of an argueably talented singer and songwriter, it's that we need to use her as an example of what can happen if addiction goes untreated.  That bum on the street with train tracks on his arm and a bottle in his hand could be the next John Lennon or Albert Einstein if given a chance. 

And before all the socially conservatives jump on my ass and accuse me of trying to give away their hard earned money to worthless people, I'm not advocating kicking you out of your house for them and giving the bum your job.  I just thing that if we funnelled the money wasted on drug enforcement and the cost of the imprisonment of addicts to a proven drug treatment system, everyone would be better off.  Less crime, less drugs on the street, less overcrowding in the prisons, less actually dangerous people getting let out of prison early due to overcrowding, and most importantly, less people dying due to lack of treatment and education.

 
{#Clap}
 jhorton wrote:
Still a 3.

 
{#No}     {#No}      {#No}   ..... hopefully your condition will pass
Still a 3.
You cheated yourself, baby, why...?

 
Chair dancing at work.... 
{#Clap}
 Mike_Sneade wrote:
There is a tribute act going around called Amy Housewine.

 
Awesome!  Does the lead singer have the requisite tattoos, bottomless supply of eyeliner and a fearsome beehive? 
There is a tribute act going around called Amy Housewine.
I just bought this song this morning.
 stalfnzo wrote:
Yet another artist I failed to appreciate in time
 
Amen
Listen also this{#Wink}:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_q5mlb3Bjzs

Her demons took her out. So sad :(


 philbertr wrote:
Like it more each time I hear it:  7 ==> 8

 
I just went from 8 to 9. 

Just a gem of its kind. What a talent, and what a loss! 
Out, brief candle!
to bad she was convinced of the songs title. she was really good as so many who haven't survived the game.{#Dancingbanana}{#Bananasplit}{#Bounce}
Nice set!
Yet another artist I failed to appreciate in time
 richlister wrote:
Yes, we know you're no good, Amy, that's why Bill implemented the PSB Button. Ahhh, the PSD button, what and invention. Bill, can you design one for my wife, so I can change what she talks about.

 

This is one of those songs that I just can't even understand - even a little - how someone could NOT like it.  Mind boggling...
And to you Amy Thank you for sacrificing yourself so that others, more ignorant than yourself, could learn from the loosing hand you were dealt in life, for some of us our loss, your sacrifice is not in vain.
The world lost something great the day Amy died, I am ashamed I did not truly appreciate her before that day.
Amy was amazing with Tony Bennett.  Heart n soul came through. Check it out. Miss u Amy. 
 richlister wrote:
Yes, we know you're no good, Amy, that's why Bill implemented the PSB Button. Ahhh, the PSD button, what and invention. Bill, can you design one for my wife, so I can change what she talks about.

 
That would be one hot-selling app!
Like it more each time I hear it:  7 ==> 8
the whole album is{#Notworthy}{#Dancingbanana}
 Stingray wrote:

Neither like/d her nor her music!

Actually completely dislike this music!

Makes me feel old and stupid!

Your sell-assessment is spot on.
3 sucko barfo´s in a row!! what´s happening in paradise?
yes, one should not say bad things about dead people. but this is sooo baaad it really hurts!
 DanO-1 wrote:
Stingray wrote:

Neither like/d her nor her music!

Actually completely dislike this music!

Makes me feel old and stupid!

Yes you are.
 
LOL!! that's some straight shootin DanO  {#Cowboy} nice
Yes, we know you're no good, Amy, that's why Bill implemented the PSB Button. Ahhh, the PSD button, what and invention. Bill, can you design one for my wife, so I can change what she talks about.
Like this but seems she always sounded no good live
 philbertr wrote:
She had remarkable insight for a drunk
 
The same could be said of scores of writers and artists before her.  Of course, there have been many more drunks with very little insight.
 Stingray wrote:

Neither like/d her nor her music!

Actually completely dislike this music!

Makes me feel old and stupid!

 
Yes you are.
Ear candy.
I'm finding that as time separates the now from the insanity of hype surrounding AW during her career, I am learning to appreciate her music more and more.  Too bad her life was such a train wreck, but that's probably what made her music so great.  hell of a trade off.
An amazing album...........

 philbertr wrote:
She had remarkable insight for a drunk
 
Took the words right out of my mouth. I laughed upon reading this comment.
She had remarkable insight for a drunk
Shame RIP
This woman could 'cook'
Don't look now, but Bill's playing Ray Charles. Haters, let's go trash his musical ability because he was once hooked on dope.
 Stingray wrote:

Neither like/d her nor her music!

Actually completely dislike this music!

Makes me feel old and stupid!

 
Too easy.
This album just gets better and better with time.  Great voice.  Fantastic production and band.